What I Shoulda Done

This week I ripped out my red and yellow day lilies. After five years of frequent bed cleanups, I decided to plant the bed with my favorite bush, hydrangeas. Of course, I wanted compact hydrangeas instead of the kind that get overgrown and messy.

In addition to reducing the mess and cleanup quotient, I remembered that hydrangeas love acidic soil, much like blueberries. And you guessed it! Last spring I planted blueberries ‘around the corner’ from the bed where I plan to plant hydrangeas. With hydrangeas HERE and blueberries THERE I can acidify the soil to my heart’s content. Easy!

We won’t talk about the clematis already established in that bed. They are doing fine and maybe can stand a little acid.

Acid-IMG_2425

But this week, I found out what I didn’t know. Tuesday was our first extension master gardener class. Dennis Patton from the Johnson County Extension Office talked about soil. To digress, once he finished discussing the definitions of ‘soil’ and ‘dirt,’ I thought I should change my Blog tag line from ‘Let’s play in the dirt’ to – yes, indeed! – ‘Let’s play in the soil.’ But it doesn’t pack the same punch.

So, soil. What I shoulda done was get a pH test for the soil in that bed. For two years, I’ve been sprinkling some product that claimed to acidify the soil. I shoulda known the name of the product, what it does, how much to use, those kind of things. But growing plants isn’t like baking a cake, right?

Oh so wrong. I still need to follow the established recipes! My blueberries are not liking their spot. Too little sun? Too little acid? Too wet? I don’t know…

Acid-IMG_2428

Tuesday I learned that the Extension Office will do a free soil test once a year. Knowing my pH will help me know what I can do – if anything – to make the soil acidic enough for blueberries and hydrangeas. Although I just read that the real acid-loving hydrangeas are blue.

Sometime in midsummer, I spotted a red hydrangea cultivar outside the grocery store and thought I’d make it my ‘test’ hydrangea for that bed. It’s had brown spots on the leaves since the end of July, and I kept telling myself that it was due to a lack of acid in the soil. But no. What I shoulda done was to Google ‘brown spots on hydrangea leaf.’ I would have learned that I probably have something called cercospora leaf spot, an infectious leaf disease. Since I have more hydrangeas on the way, the question is whether I pull that plant out or try to fix the problem with a fungicide.

Acid-02-IMG_2427

So glad I’m taking these classes. I’m still hoping that the summer of 2015 has fewer blues!

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4 thoughts on “What I Shoulda Done

  1. Ah, yes! You can tell a Master Gardener by her use of “soil”. I had to destroy a hydrangea with the leaf spot just recently. It looks like I got it out in time to save the others. It hurts, but it’s for the greater good. You May have inspired me to do the pH test annually; it’s been years and perhaps that’s at the root of many of my problems. (haha)

    • I’m lucky that this was a grocery store buy – inexpensive and I’m just not that attached to it. The blueberries – that’s a different story… Thanks for stopping and thanks for that pun – I plan to use it someday soon!

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