The Acid Test

My blueberries are not growing. Surviving not thriving? I’ve used a powdered soil ‘acidifier’ since planting them last fall, but I started to wonder. Was it doing the trick?

Since learning about the need for soil tests, I got out my trusty trowel and dug up soil from that bed. The results? My pH is 7.5 – way on the alkaline side of things. Since I planned to plant hydrangeas on the east side (same bed), I added sulfur pellets to the soil, side-dressing the blueberries.

And while out picking up the sulfur, I found two “pee wee” Hydrangea quercifolia (oakleaf hydrangea) that according to the nursery will not require a highly acid soil. We’ll see.

hydrangea-IMG_2503

I love the burgundy color and leathery look to the leaves, although the red is this plant’s fall color. I imagine the new leaves this coming spring will be dark green.

If you wonder how to amend your soil this fall, you may be interested in soil testing. Here are the how’s and why’s from the Kansas State Research and Extension office. Your State Extension Office may offer free soil testing too!

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7 thoughts on “The Acid Test

  1. It is very hard to acidify soil. You have to be very diligent about adding acidifiers several times a year. Also, blueberries are notoriously slow to produce much. Mine took at least 7 years to mature. They never tell you that in the instructions when you plant them.

  2. Pingback: “Right Plant, Right Place” | newgardenerblues

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